Polygonal masonry

Polygonal masonry is a technique of stone wall construction. True polygonal masonry is a technique wherein the visible surfaces of the stones are dressed with straight sides or joints, giving the block the appearance of a polygon.

This technique is found throughout the world and sometimes corresponds to the less technical category of Cyclopean masonry.


Armenia

Saint Hripsime Church, 618, with later alterations

Bolivia

Bosnia

The remains of the outer walls of Daorson, as seen in 2013

Brazil

Bulgaria

Canada

Hatley Castle, garden side

China

Chile

Ahu Vinapú

Crimea

Easter Island

Ecuador

Finland

A part of the wall of the Bomarsund Fortress

Germany

Georgia

Greece

Section of polygonal wall at Delphi

Hungary

India

Indonesia

Iran

Italy

Velia, Porta Rosa

In Italy, polygonal masonry is particularly indicative of the region of Latium, but it occurs also in Etruria, Lucania, Samnium, and Umbria; scholars including Giuseppe Lugli have carried out studies of the technique. Some notable sites that have fortification walls built in this technique include Norba, Signia, Alatri, Boiano, Circeo, Cosa, Alba Fucens, Palestrina, and Terracina. The Porta Rosa of the ancient city of Velia employs a variant of the technique known as Lesbian masonry.

Japan

Naha Shuri Castle

Latvia

Daugavpils Fortress

Malta

Mexico

Montenegro

Entrance to Stützpunkt Grabovac at the fort's rear

Morocco

Peru

Sacsayhuamán, Cusco, Perú, 2015-07-31, DD 27.JPG
Sacsayhuamán, Cusco, Perú
Pumacocha Archaeological site - wall.jpg
Pumacocha Archaeological site - wall

Philippines

Portugal

Romania

Iulia Hasdeu Castle

Russia

Fort Alexander I

Spain

Sudan

Sweden

Syria

Hosn Suleiman temple
  • Barjaka
  • Bauda
Pyramidal tomb in 6th century Bauda, one of the former Dead Cities in northwestern Syria
  • Benastur Monastery
  • Churches of Sheikh Suleiman village
  • Deir Qeita
  • Kharab Shams Basilica
The press-house
  • Mushabbak Basilica
  • Refade
  • Qatura

Thailand

Turkey

Selimiye Kışlası
Memorial Quadrangle Gate at Yale

United Kingdom

United States

  • P. Gros. 1996. L'architecture romaine: du début du IIIe siècle av. J.-C. à la fin du Haut-Empire. 2 v. Paris: Picard.
Uses material from the Wikipedia article Polygonal masonry, released under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license.